17 Streamlining your offerings to bring in more of the right clients with Meghan Dicklin

 
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About this episode

I know so many of you are setting BIG goals this year and planning exactly how you’re going to make those a reality in your life and business. But as you plan, I want to be sure your mindset is in the right place and you’re thinking about what you’re ready to let go of that may no longer be serving you (and how you can create space for something that is!). That’s why today, we’re diving into how to clear out products and offerings that are holding you back in business so you can achieve more time and more focus to create consistent, reliable income, and a strong business foundation.


Show notes

In this episode, we chat about:

  • How Meghan started working with entrepreneurs to build their businesses in a way that allows them freedom and flexibility needed to both run a business and raise a family

  • The number one challenge Meghan sees in mothers trying to structure their business in a way that suits their lifestyle and what you can do instead to create more time AND money

  • Why more offerings doesn’t necessarily mean more income (and how it can actually have a negative impact on your business)

  • Tackling the mindset struggles behind letting go of products and offerings that you may have invested a lot of time or energy in so you can bring in more of the right clients

  • How to use your time more effectively in marketing your offers and a fun study on choice and jam flavors (yes, like the kind you put on your toast!) that will totally shift your mindset around this

  • Actionable tips for de-cluttering your business offerings (even if you have no idea where to start!) so you can create a strong foundation to convert more sales and start thriving


About Meghan Dicklin

Meghan Dicklin knows it’s possible to run a business and raise a family without losing your mind, but knows it takes resilience and a great support system. She has lived at the intersection of marketing, business operations, and innovation for over a decade and uses this expertise to create more time, more wealth, and more connections for business owners raising young children.

Through Nesting Your Business, Meghan helps entrepreneurs gain the clarity, focus, and space to re-engineer a business to serve their personal and professional goals. This may be designing the perfect maternity leave for a solopreneur or bringing on a team for a growing operation.

Before having her first child, she walked away from a successful corporate career in financial advertising because she knew she wanted to do things differently.

She believes investing in a plan and structure today leads to the freedom and flexibility that business owners crave.

To download Meghan’s Your Business: During Pregnancy & With a Baby - Weekly Planner click here. The weekly planner is your guide and resource to navigating your business through pregnancy and the first 6 months of your baby's life. Each week you'll receive encouragement, stories, and business exercises to prepare your business to take a maternity leave and return to work as a parent.


Resources mentioned in this episode

From the Freakonomics podcast, here’s how Schwartz describes the very memorable jam study, by the psychologists Mark Lepper and Sheena Iyengar:

When researchers set up [in a gourmet food store] a display featuring a line of exotic, high-quality jams, customers who came by could taste samples, and they were given a coupon for a dollar off if they bought a jar. In one condition of the study, 6 varieties of the jam were available for tasting. In another, 24 varieties were available. In either case, the entire set of 24 varieties was available for purchase. The large array of jams attracted more people to the table than the small array, though in both cases people tasted about the same number of jams on average. When it came to buying, however, a huge difference became evident. Thirty percent of the people exposed to the small array of jams actually bought a jar; only 3 percent of those exposed to the large array of jams did so.